Tue. Jun 18th, 2024

What’s the difference between Sorry Day and the National Apology?

Tyler Mitchell By Tyler Mitchell Jun9,2024
National Sorry Day, observed on May 26, is a day that recognises the experiences and strength of Stolen Generations survivors.
It recognises the anniversary of the , the result of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families.
The Bringing Them Home Report recommended that the government apologise to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples affected by the Stolen Generations.
Some often confuse National Sorry Day with .

While both days acknowledge the trauma experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, there is an important difference between the two.

National Sorry Day

The Bringing Them Home report which was tabled in federal parliament on May 26, 1997.
The first Sorry Day was held on May 26, 1998 to recognise the report’s findings and the injustices experienced by Stolen Generations survivors and their families.

The Bringing Them Home report documented the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and found that issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities directly correlated with the Stolen Generations.

For example, the report found that young people with parents, grandparents or great-grandparents who were taken are 50 per cent more likely to be charged by police, and 30 per cent less likely to be in good health.
The report concluded that the Stolen Generations was a violation of human rights.
came out of the Bringing Them Home report, one of which was for an apology from the Australian Government for the continued trauma of the Stolen Generations.
Today, some use National Sorry Day to protest “a new Stolen Generation”, citing the in the present time.

The National Apology

On the other hand, the National Apology refers to the apology that was delivered by former prime minister Kevin Rudd on behalf of the federal government to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, particularly to the Stolen Generations.

The apology was delivered on February 13, 2008, and the National Apology is commemorated on that date each year.

This apology was touted as a symbol of change addressing injustices faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities as well as the pain inflicted by past assimilation policies.

The time has now come for the nation to turn a new page in Australia’s history by righting the wrongs of the past and so moving forward with confidence to the future.

Kevin Rudd

Why is it important to understand the difference between the two?

The National Apology and National Sorry Day are both opportunities to reflect on and acknowledge the generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples that have been affected by past government policies.
The National Apology is the government’s response to just one recommendation from the total 54 recommendations included in The Bringing Them Home report.
National Sorry Day and the National Apology are two sides of the same coin; one is a call to action and the other is the government’s response to this.

Aboriginal Counselling Services 0410 539 905

Tyler Mitchell

By Tyler Mitchell

Tyler is a renowned journalist with years of experience covering a wide range of topics including politics, entertainment, and technology. His insightful analysis and compelling storytelling have made him a trusted source for breaking news and expert commentary.

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One thought on “What’s the difference between Sorry Day and the National Apology?”
  1. As an indigenous person, I believe that National Sorry Day and the National Apology are both important in acknowledging the historical injustices faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. While National Sorry Day specifically honours the strength of Stolen Generations survivors, the National Apology is a formal recognition of the government’s past wrongdoings and a step towards reconciliation. It’s crucial for these events to continue educating and raising awareness about the ongoing impact of colonization on indigenous communities.

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