US pulling troops from Chad, Niger

Samantha Parker By Samantha Parker Jun16,2024

The U.S. is expected to begin pulling troops out of the African nations of Chad and Niger following deteriorating relations with both countries, including demands for American forces to leave.

A U.S. exit or large drawdown from both countries is expected to have a wide impact on Washington’s efforts to conduct counter-terrorism operations in Africa, where Al-Shabaab, Boko Haram and other extremist terrorist groups remain at large.

There are about a 1,000 U.S. troops in Niger and around around 100 in Chad. The potential withdrawal of those troops also comes as Russia is increasing its influence in Africa.

A U.S. delegation met this week with officials in Niamey, Niger, to discuss a safe withdrawal of American troops from the country, according to the Pentagon.

The delegation includes U.S. Ambassador to Niger Kathleen FitzGibbon and Maj. Gen. Kenneth Ekman, the director of strategy, engagement and programs at U.S. Africa Command.

Pentagon press secretary Maj. Gen. Pat Ryder told reporters Thursday there will be a follow up meeting involving other Defense Department officials next week to “coordinate the withdrawal process in a transparent manner and with mutual respect.”

Ryder said the assumption is that all U.S. troops will soon leave Niger, but stressed the Pentagon “remains committed to countering violent extremist organizations in West Africa.”

“The department will continue to support whole of government approaches to work with African leaders to maintain stability and address terrorist threats in the region, including addressing core issues that drive insecurity,” Ryder said.

Niger was rocked by a military coup in July of last year, and junta leaders have pushed for a U.S. exit. The military junta allegedly has close ties with Russia’s private paramilitary company the Wagner Group, which has a sizeable presence in Africa there that benefits Moscow.

The military in Chad also seized power there three years ago, though there are upcoming elections in May that could restore authority back to elected officials.

Ryder said U.S. Africa Command is also talking with Chadian officials and plan to reposition some troops out of the country, though he said some had already planned to depart.

“This is a temporary step,” he said of the repositioning in Chad, “as part of a ongoing review of our security cooperation, which will resume after Chad’s May 6 presidential election.”

Samantha Parker

By Samantha Parker

Samantha is a seasoned journalist with a passion for uncovering the truth behind the headlines. With years of experience in investigative reporting, she has covered a wide range of topics including politics, crime, and entertainment. Her in-depth analysis and commitment to factual accuracy make her a respected voice in the field of journalism.

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2 thoughts on “US pulling troops from Chad, Niger”
  1. A U.S. exit or large drawdown from both countries is expected to have a wide impact on Washington’s efforts to conduct counter-terrorism operations in Africa, where Al-Shabaab, Boko Haram and other extremist terrorist groups remain at large. There are about a 1,000 U.S. troops in Niger and around around 100 in Chad. The potential withdrawal of those troops also comes as Russia is increasing its influence in Africa. A U.S. delegation met this week with officials in Niamey, Niger, to discuss a safe withdrawal of American troops from the country, according to the Pentagon. The delegation includes U.S. Ambassador to Niger Kathleen FitzGibbon and Maj. Gen. Kenneth Ekman, the director of strategy, engagement and programs at U.S. Africa Command. Pentagon press secretary Maj. Gen. Pat Ryder told reporters Thursday there will be a follow-up meeting involving other Defense Department officials next week to “coordinate the withdrawal process in a transparent manner and with mutual respect. Ryder said the assumption is that all U.S. troops will soon leave Niger, but stressed the Pentagon “remains committed to countering violent extremist organizations in West Africa. The department will continue to support a whole-of-government approach to work with African leaders to

  2. Will the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Niger and Chad significantly impact the effectiveness of counter-terrorism operations in Africa?

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